Things I've always wanted to do

Things I’ve always wanted to do

I finally took my initial music lesson this year in February, which I have wanted to do since I was nine.

It only took me fifteen years to get around to it because I was almost 27 years old at the time.

The question naturally arises as to the cause of the lag. I put off taking piano lessons for a long time since my family, and I were poor when I was young, but now that I’m older, I want to try.

I want to try

I knew that was just an excuse until I obtained my first part-time job at sixteen. 

Then one day, I heard that TV host Jonathan Ross was taking up the instrument.

He was not a snob! He was much older than I was! If he could achieve it, then surely I could as well, which is what I wanted to do.

Hearing this solidified in my mind the need to consider taking lots of instructional courses seriously.

And I did ponder the possibility. It was a subject I gave some consideration to.

Whenever I encountered a pianist, saw a piano, or even just heard the word “piano,” I thought of Jonathan Ross on television. 

I told myself, “When I’m rich, I’ll learn.” 

When I'm rich

Then, while I was a professor in Italy, fortune smiled upon me in the form of a student who happened to be a piano instructor.

That’s what I thought; why do I try? When she told me, I couldn’t contain my enthusiasm; I begged her to let me join the game right now.

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True or false?

She volunteered to instruct me at no cost.

It costs nothing! I couldn’t resist the opportunity and drove straight to her place the following morning.

Naturally, I didn’t act like that. Indeed, that is the course of action I should have taken. 

About seven years later, I was instructing a multicultural class in Bournemouth, England.

When I was in school, one of my students inquired if I played any instruments. Then I wanted to do good!

To which I always respond, “No, but I’ve always needed to be able to play the violin.

” What else have you done to make your fantasy come true?” he asked with a grin.

In a way, this question took me by surprise.

I realized I had performed nothing and hadn’t even considered it a dream before; I’d just considered it something I’d enjoy doing if I could. 

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Nonetheless, that was just a dream.

hat was just a dream

It kept popping back into my head. I should have acted, but why hadn’t I? Why was it that I just couldn’t pull it off?

For what reason did I hesitate? 

I want to tell you how I immediately ran home to find myself a teacher. However, I didn’t. 

A few months later, I decided to take the plunge. Again, piano lessons made it onto my list of leisure activities I want to begin doing.

The words of my pupil, “What have you implemented to create your fantasy come true?” echoed in my head. 

“Right! Finally, that’s all there is to it. This is what I had in mind.

Turning to my reliable buddy, Google, I researched “classical pianists in Bournemouth” and discovered one who resided 5 minutes from my flat. 

Plus, she offered no-risk demo classes. To put it another way: I would have nothing to lose.

I immediately emailed her and scheduled a class for the following week. 

I can’t believe how much I’ve learned in just eight months and a handful of “good job” stickers.

The question of why I waited so long to realize this remains unanswered. 

It wasn’t because of cost; I could have gotten Italian language instruction for free in Italy.

It wasn’t because I couldn’t find a qualified instructor; I’d never looked for one before.

When I eventually located her, her apartment was only a few minutes’ walk from mine.

When it came down to it, though, the actual reason was that I was terrified. 

I was worried that I wasn’t talented enough, rich enough, youthful enough, comfortable enough, or anything else to be nervous about when attempting to study an instrument. Individuals like me didn’t engage in such behaviour.

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A lot of us do this, right?

How many of us avoid trying new things because we’re afraid of being laughed at or judged negatively?

Consider the worst-case scenario. To put it simply, I would’ve been a terrible pianist. Additionally, only my instructor would have known. 

Is it correct to say I always wanted it?

Is it correct to say I always wanted it

Why is it that we’re so reluctant to try new things? 

Learning an instrument is challenging but not as challenging as I had anticipated.

When you accomplish something you didn’t think was possible, your enthusiasm soars, and you start wondering, “Wait a minute; what could I do?” 

These days, I’m focusing on getting my work out into the world and making my first tentative steps toward independence.

When I set my mind to something, I always want to do something

But so what? 

There is a lot to lose and nothing to gain.